Experimenting with Linux can have its pitfalls, and it is still a challenge in many areas. But I thought that I would give it a try once more. It has been 10 years, and in that time Linux has certainly changed.

What has really changed is software. One part of this is gaming, where, thanks to Steam, we have seen a major development in this area. Their very own SteamOS is based on Debian, and that means it can run natively in Ubuntu. The number of games for SteamOS is still limited, this is probably the single biggest development in Linux gaming.

There are many mainstream browsers available, including the number one browser Google Chrome. Yes, even its open-sourced variant Chromium makes an appearance in many software repositories. However,  you can find many mainstream software titles. This includes the new Skype client for Linux and an official Spotify client.

LInux Deskop

What I have noticed is this OS that lets you tinker and play again like an old 8 or 16-bit computer is starting to make computing fun again, something along the lines of the Raspberry Pi. Something more than merely taking a computer out of the box and powering it on, this is something you can build.

What is stopping Linux being mainstream?

For most people, they will often use the OS already on their computer and usually only the OS that is on the machine. So that is one reason why Windows still dominates the desktop.

To be successful, Linux needs backing from leading hardware manufacturers, which is starting to happen through Ubuntu’s hardware partners like Lenovo and Dell. There has been some success with ChromeOS on Chromebooks.

As we have seen with the growth of Open Source in the last few years, it certainly is the future of Linux and other forms of Open Source software continues to get recognition. The likelihood of this becoming all depends on hardware manufacturers and major names such as Steam and Google, who have shown a commitment to Open Source software.